Daily Meditations for July

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July 11

SANCTIFIED HASTE
Psalm 119:59,60

    As the saying goes, "Haste makes waste.''  But there is one way in which haste reveals grace. The psalmist spoke of this in Psalm 119:59,60, when he said, "I thought on my ways, and turned my feet unto Thy testimonies. I made haste, and delayed not to keep Thy commandments.''

    Or as our versification has it:

    I thought upon my ways,
    Thy testimonies learned;
    With earnest haste, and waiting not,
    To Thy commands I turned.

    When you find yourself walking in sin — and how often is that not the case? — delay not but with all haste get back into the law of God. You just cannot get back too quickly!  Take your time about it, and you are adding to your sin.  For you are still saying that walking in sin is good, and that leaving it behind is losing something you deem precious.

    What is more, we cannot think upon our ways in the light of God's law too quickly. We may be quick to look into a mirror to see if our hair is combed, whether it is turning gray, or whether our face is clean; but why are we so slow in looking into God's law?

    The psalmist did so quickly because of the temptations that surrounded him. He had enemies that ridiculed him, taunted him, and made a fool of him. And he was eager, because of his old sinful nature, to stop this derision by hiding his faith.  And we have the same problem, so that we do not think on the way God wants us to walk, but on the way that pleases our sinful flesh. And we too need to be reminded to give serious thought every hour of the day to God's law, and to seek to find out whether we are walking in God's way or in our own fleshly way.

    When we find any violation of God's law, we must not hesitate to turn from it and go back to the way God would have us walk.

    How about it? Are you carrying a sin with you, thinking that when you get older, you will drop it? Do not think so for a moment!  The longer you walk in it, the harder it will become to break from it. Be quick to turn from it, and your spiritual muscles will be strengthened so you can walk more firmly in a way that pleases God.

Read: Luke 15:11-24
Psalter versification: 328:2

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 120
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 11
1 Chronicles 12:1-18
Acts 28:1-31
Psalm 9:1-12
Proverbs 19:1-3

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Quote for Reflection:

 “Blessed are they in whose ears that terrible trumpet always sounds, ‘Arise ye dead, and come to judgment.’  From this the presence of that Judge coming to judgment is perpetually borne in mind, lest at his sight they be confounded with the wicked ( Rev. 6:16 ), but that they may be found worthy to stand before the Son of Man.”  Francis Turretin (1623-1687) Pastor of Geneva


July 12

MIDNIGHT THANKSGIVING
Psalm 119:61,62

    Out of custom and habit we often say ''Thank you'' when someone gives something to us. But in all sincerity could you say "Thank you" to God for giving us His law with all its strict requirements? It is interesting to note that in Psalm 119:61,62 the psalmist does that. He writes, "The bands of the wicked have robbed me: but I have not forgotten Thy law. At midnight I will rise to give thanks unto Thee because of Thy righteous judgments."

    Now God's righteous judgments are that which God judges to be the right thing for man to do. It is easy to say that it is good that there are laws for the neighbor to keep. That makes our life safer and provides more pleasure for our flesh. But can you sincerely sing:

    While snares beset my path,
    Thy law I keep in view;
    At midnight I will give Thee praise
    For all Thy judgments true.

    Since sleep is so sweet why should we rise up at midnight, or stay awake till midnight to thank God for His law? Does not that law deny us so much pleasure and threaten us with so much misery? Especially when our enemies oppress us, there is such an urge to do to them what God's law forbids us. We want to get revenge. We want to do to them what they did to us, or even to do more harm to them. Shall we rise up at midnight to give God thanks for that law that denies getting even with them?

    Yes, the day is not long enough to thank God for His law. It teaches us how to live in love toward Him, but also His great love for us. We on this side of the cross surely have reason for midnight thanksgiving. Only in the way of knowing that law can we understand and appreciate the cross of His Son. God's law demanded that cross as the way to our salvation. Knowing that law we can understand what His Son suffered for us, and how He fulfilled the demands of that law for us.

    And seeing this by His grace, the day is not long enough to praise and thank Him. In fact God has promised an endless day that has no night, so that we can in the new Jerusalem praise and thank Him for that salvation which He wrought through His Son.

Read: Psalm 19
Psalter versification: 328:3

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 123
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 12:19-40 ; 1 Chronicles 13 ; 1 Chronicles 14:1-17
Romans 1:1-17
Psalm 9:13-20
Proverbs 19:4-5

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Quote for Reflection:

It is shocking to think how persons dare to remain members of Christian churches, and even to enter the pulpit, when they are conscious that their private life is foul. Oh, how can they do it? How is it that their hearts have grown so hard?   What! hath the devil bewitched them? Hath he turned them away from being men, and made them as devilish as himself, that they should dare to pray in public, and to sit at the sacramental table, and to administer ordinances, while their hands are foul, and their hearts unclean, and their lives are full of sin? I charge you, if there are any of you whose lives are not consistent, give up your profession, or else make your lives what they should be. May the eternal Spirit, who still winnows his Church, blow away the chaff, and heave only the good golden wheat upon the floor! And if you know yourselves to be living in any sin, may God help you to mourn over it, to loathe it, to go to Christ about it to-night; to take hold of him, to wash his feet with your tears, to repent unfeignedly, and then to begin anew in his strength, a life which shall be such as becometh the gospel.  C. Spurgeon on Philippians 1:27


July 13

A BLESSED COMPANIONSHIP
Psalm 119:63

    Who are your friends? In whose company do you delight? Can you sincerely say with the psalmist what he wrote in Psalm 119:63?   He wrote, "I am a companion of all them that fear Thee, and of them that keep Thy precepts."  Or is there more enjoyment for you to be with those who trample God's law under foot, show no fear of God, and glory in sin?

    We do well to note that the fear of God reveals itself in keeping His precepts. Then, too, having the ungodly as your companions does not merely mean literal  fellowship with them.  It also includes bringing them into your home through your radio and television set to sing their sinful songs and enact sin for your entertainment. How many hours a day are they your companions?

    But notice that the psalmist says that he is a companion of those who fear God. This we are, not only when we meet with them in God's house on the Sabbath but also when we visit them in their afflictions, and help them in every way we can to fight the good fight of faith.

    That. is why in verse 64 the psalmist writes, "The earth, O Lord, is full of Thy mercy: Teach me Thy statutes.''  Not only is it God's mercy that enables us to become companions of those that fear Him; but we must be taught His statues.  And in His mercy, that is in Christ, Who in mercy was sent to make it all possible God teaches us His statutes.   As we sing:

    All those who fear Thy name
    Shall my companions be:
    Thy mercy fills the earth, O Lord;
    Thy statutes teach Thou me.

    Did you ever think of it that way?  God's mercy teaches us His law and thus makes us companions with those that fear Him.  When the policeman looks the other way when we break a traffic law, we call that a merciful act. No, in His mercy God shows us the exactness of His law. For only in God's law is there life. And only through God's law do we see our sins and sinfulness. That makes us see the need of Christ's cross. Without knowing that law, the cross means nothing. Without, knowing that law we cannot have the blessed companionship with Christ which is life everlasting.

Read: John 17
Psalter versification: 328:3

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 354
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 15 ; I Chronicles 16:1-36
Romans 1:18-32
Psalm 10:1-15
Proverbs 19:6-7

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Quote for Reflection:

“For from the error of not knowing, or understanding, what sin is, there necessarily arises another error, that people cannot know or understand what grace is.”   – Martin Luther


July 14

A NECESSARY PRAYER
Psalm 43:1

    It is obvious that man has come a long way since the day of David. All our labor-saving devices, medical advances, means of transportation, bodily comforts and conveniences make life in the Old Testament look dull and monotonous. But we must not overlook the fact that man has also come a long way in sin! And that includes attacks upon the truth of God's word. Therefore when in Psalm 43:1 David wrote, "Judge me, O God, and plead my cause against an ungodly nation: O deliver me from the deceitful and unjust man," we have a prayer that we ourselves are in great need of presenting to God.

    Although we do not have ''an ungodly nation'' from which we need physical and bodily deliverance, we are surrounded by deceitful and unjust men who twist the Scriptures and attack us with heretical teachings. We are attacked and also our children, as far as our spiritual lives are concerned, and are assaulted with sharp arrows of the lie and with crafty approaches that appeal to our flesh. We, too, should pray:

    Judge me, God of my salvation,
    Plead my cause, for Thee I trust;
    Hear my earnest supplication,
    Save me from my foes unjust.

    The sad and alarming fact today is that men do not take as seriously the attack of Satan and the men he uses to attack us with false doctrines, as they do the fear of a nuclear war that will bring material loss and painful death. Men fear other men far more than they fear Satan and his innumerable host that tries to turn us away from Christ, and to seek the things below rather than the things above in Christ's kingdom.

    But remember that not only is the antichrist coming soon to have control of the whole earth and all men upon it, but as we read in I John 2:18, there are already many antichrists who are working hard to deceive us and our children, seeking to get us to seek the world and look for the Antichrist rather than seek the things above and look for Christ to come.

    We have very much need to pray that God will save His church from the antichrists which try to turn us away from Christ and the salvation from sin and from the lie which He will bring.

Read: Psalm 43
Psalter versification: 120:1

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 55
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 16:37-43 ; I Chronicles 17 ; I Chronicles 18:1-17
Romans 2:1-24
Psalm 10:16-18
Proverbs 19:8-9

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Quote for Reflection:

“Therefore all men are conceived in sin, and by nature children of wrath, incapable of saving good, prone to evil, dead in sin, and in bondage thereto, and without the regenerating grace of the Holy Spirit, they are neither able nor willing to return to God, to reform the depravity of their nature, nor to dispose themselves to reformation. “There remain, however, in man since the fall, the glimmerings of natural light, whereby he retains some knowledge of God, of natural things, and of the differences between good and evil, and discovers some regard for virtue, good order in society, and for maintaining an orderly external deportment. But so far is this light of nature from being sufficient to bring him to a saving knowledge of God, and to true conversion, that he is incapable of using it aright even in things natural and civil. Nay further, this light, such as it is, man in various ways renders wholly polluted, and holds it in unrighteousness, by doing which he becomes inexcusable before God.”   – Canons of Dordt, III/IV, Art. 2-3


July 15

CORRECT ANSWERS TO OUR QUESTIONS
Psalm 43:2

    May we ask God why He has done this or that? Is this not lifting ourselves in pride above Him and making Him our servant? Well, it makes a difference why you ask your question. Did not Jesus on the cross ask the Father why He had forsaken Him? And when David in Psalm 43:2 asks, "For Thou art the God of my strength: why hast Thou cast me off? why do I go mourning because of the oppression of the enemy?"  we do not have a sinful prayer. He is not questioning God's justice or His mercy or grace.

    God is his strength, and in this confession David reveals that he believes that God is able to deliver him. And because we with David believe this, we do not necessarily sin when we sing:

    On Thy strength alone relying,
    Why am I cast off by Thee,
    In my helpless sorrow sighing
    While the foe oppresses me?

    Neither with David nor with us is it fault-finding. We question neither God's justice nor His love. In fact we clearly confess His ability to save us. For indeed every heartbeat and breath of life comes from Him. He is our strength in every sense, for our enemy also gets every heartbeat and breath only from God.

    But why then does David ask God why He has cast him off so that unbelievers oppress him? The answer is that we can get the correct answer to all our questions only from God. And further, what we must always remember is that we must go to God with all our problems. David sets a good example here for us.

    The one difference between David and us is that we have the complete word of God in the sixty-six books of Scripture. We live on this side of the cross of Christ and have a richer picture of what God has in His counsel. That Word of God has the answer to all our questions. We must search it, study it, as well as read it and hear it preached. And we must and may in prayer ask God to open the Scriptures to us. But if we do not read and study His word, we are not sincere in our request for light. God spoke and preserved His speech for us, so that we would have correct answers to all our questions.

Read: Psalm 42
Psalter versification: 120:2

 Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 9
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 19 ; 1 Chronicles 20 ; 1 Chronicles 21
Romans 2:25-29 ; Romans 3:1- 8
Psalm 11:1-7
Proverbs 19:10-12

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Quote for Reflection:

faith cannot be truly preached, without wholly depriving man of all praise by ascribing all to God’s mercy - it follows, that we are assisted by no works in obtaining righteousness.          –John Calvin


July 16

THE LIGHT OF GOD'S TRUTH
Psalm 43:3

    The light of the sun which God gives us enables us to see and enjoy the things in creation round about us. But there is also a mental, intellectual, spiritual light that He gives us. When we do not understand a certain matter, someone may offer to help us and say. "Let me give you some light on the subject." And it is in that sense that David in Psalm 43:3 writes, "O send out Thy light and Thy truth: let them lead me: Let them bring me unto Thy holy hill, and to Thy tabernacles."  Or as we sing it in our versification:

    Light and truth, my way attending,
    Send Thou forth to be my guide,
    Till Thy holy mount ascending,
    I within Thy house abide.

    You see, David's way had become dark. For he had been driven from Jerusalem, had to flee from Absalom, and was eager to get back where God's dwelling place was. He did not see why God separated him from His holy hill. His question in verse 2 was, "Why hast Thou cast me off? why go I mourning because of the oppression of the enemy?"

    Plainly he wanted light in that dark hour. And that means that he wanted God's grace to rest upon him, but also that he wanted to be enlightened in his mind as to why God brought him into this situation. He wants light but also truth.

    Now truth is what gives us light on our dark pathway. Remember that Jesus said in John 14:6, "I am the way, the truth and the life."  And if we see Christ, we have light upon our pathway no matter how dark it is around us.  Go to His cross. There God used Satan, Judas, and the wicked Jews as tools to bring us the victory which a few days later we saw in His resurrection from the dead as our Head. We were not defeated there at His cross but victorious over sin, the curse, death, and the grave!

    So it is today. Alt the wicked in all their evils are tools in God's hand whereby He is preparing the way for Christ to return and bring us to His holy hill in heaven where He dwells. And all our sicknesses and pains are also His means to bring us home to a life without sin and completely free from the curse.

Read: Psalm 3
Psalter versification: 120:3

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 76
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 22 ; 1 Chronicles 23:1-32
Romans 3:9-31
Psalm 12:1-8
Proverbs 19:13-14

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Quote for Reflection:

It will be your duty to insist, by all means, if you can obtain an audience, which I am persuaded you may, that the ceremonies which savor in the least of superstition should be abolished from the public service.   Calvin to M. Bucer


July 17

A REVEALING THANKFULNESS AND PRAISE
Psalm 43:4

    One way to determine whether an unconscious person hurt in an accident is alive is to find out whether his heart is beating. One way to become aware that one's spiritual heart is beating is to look for what David writes in Psalm 48:4. He had cried out of being cast off and driven from God's house, which was a symbol of His love for His church. And he had prayed for light and truth to assure him that God's love would bring him back. That is why he wrote, "Then will I go unto the altar of God, unto God my exceeding great joy: yea, upon the harp will I praise Thee, O God my God."  If God would bring him back, he would do this.

    There are two spiritual activities mentioned here, two deeds that are clearly related to each other and yet distinct from each other. Going to God's altar is bringing to Him a sacrifice of thanksgiving, and declaring how good He is. The other is singing His praises, which includes thanksgiving but also speaks of His wisdom, power, faithfulness, love, mercy, and grace. Praise includes thanksgiving, but it is much more. And so we sing:

    At Thy sacred altar bending,
    God, my God, my boundless joy,
    Harp and voice, in worship blending.
    For Thy praise will I employ.

    For us today, after the veil of the temple was rent in twain, and the whole temple, as a type of God's fellowship with us in Christ, faded away, we still show our spiritual life by singing His praises and bringing an offering of thanksgiving to help the poor and needy and to support the preaching of God's great goodness unto His church.

    David said that he will thank God and praise Him. So will we when the light goes up in our souls and we see what He did for us in Christ. Search your soul today to see how strongly your spiritual heart beats and how thankful you are for the salvation God gave you through the altar of the cross of Christ. It is a good idea to feel your pulse; and if your heart is skipping some beats, go to the Great Physician and ask Him to restore you to a life that is truly thankful and considers God to be your exceeding great joy.

Read: Psalm 138
Psalter versification: 120:4

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 29
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 24 ; 1 Chronicles 25 ; 1 Chronicles 26:1-11
Romans 4:1-12
Psalm 13:1-6
Proverbs 19:15-16

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Quote for Reflection:

evil men and seducers wax worse and worse. The falling stone gathers momentum, and the further it rolls down hill, the greater is its velocity. So it is with one who has thoroughly sold himself to the devil—he gives his wretched victims no rest, but urges them on from crime to crime, until their cup of iniquity is full. Satan is a merciless taskmaster, who ever demands an increasing tale of bricks from his slaves. How earnestly we should pray to be delivered from the evil one!   – Arthur W. Pink


July 18

A BLESSED HOPE
Psalm 43:5

    So far in considering David's words in Psalm 43, the chorus of our versification was not given. The time has now come for us to sing:

    O my soul, why art thou grieving?
    What disquiets and dismays?
    Hope in God; His help receiving,
    I shall yet my Savior praise.

    That is the way David ends his Psalm. He pleaded for help and was in deep need of spiritual light. And he wanted badly to go back to God's house where his joy was full, because there God revealed His boundless love in the forgiveness of our sins through the shed blood of Christ.

    But now, when God enlightened him, he wrote, "Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? Hope in God: for I shall yet praise Him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God" (Psalm 43:5).

    You see, when we remember what God did for us through the cross of Christ, and typically displayed in the tabernacle, we are by God's grace given hope. And, remember, that hope is confident expectancy. To hope is to desire with the expectation that it will come. And because God enlightened him by causing him to think of what went on in the tabernacle, David had hope worked in him, and he was sure he would go back to it.

    Are you grieving?  Is your soul disquieted and dismayed because of something that happened to your earthly life? Is your soul cast down and you fail to look up to the "health of your countenance" and your God?

    Then take note of the fact that with all his troubles David went to God. Eight times in this brief Psalm he speaks of God and calls Him his God. With David go to Him as we can now meet Him in His word, and as we now have light shed upon that altar in His earthly house. For now we see the Lamb of God sacrificed for our sins and the veil of the temple rent in twain, because a way has been prepared for us to live with God. In hope look for that day, and your present sorrows will fade away, and you will with joy look for that day when you will dwell with Him in His glory. What a blessed hope that is!

Read: I Peter 1
Psalter versification: Chorus of 120

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 200
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 26:12-32 ;   1 Chronicles 27:1-34
Romans 4:13-25 ;   Romans 5:1-5
Psalm 14:1-7
Proverbs 19:17

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Quote for Reflection:

How entirely is the life of the Christian a hidden life; “hid with Christ in God;” hid from the world, as a spring shut up, so that they can neither see fully its excellence, nor reach it in such a way as to disturb or break it up at is source.
— George Burrowes, The Song of Solomon, p. 384 (commentary on 4:12)


July 19

DEALT WITH AS GOD PROMISED
Psalm 119: 65, 66

    There are a few times when we are ready to agree that God has dealt well with us. Most of the time, however, things do not go our way and we complain that He is not treating us well. The basic reason for this complaining is that we do not see things as the psalmist does when in Psalm 119:65,66 he writes, "Thou hast dealt well with Thy servant, O Lord, according to Thy word. Teach me good judgment and knowledge; for I have believed Thy commandments."

    Did you notice that he says that God deals well with us according to His word? Our versification explains this for us when it states:

    Thou, Lord, hast dealt well with Thy servant,
    Thy promise is faithful and just;
    Instruct me in judgment and knowledge,
    For in Thy commandments I trust.

    God's word here is His word of Promise. Always and constantly God is dealing well with us in that he is giving us what He promised in Christ. That which He promised us is a new sinless life with Him in the new creation. And all that He sends us works together to bring us there. Even as the plans of a house call for pieces of wood to be cut at a certain length and nails to be driven here and there, so our glory calls for affliction and pain, death and the grave through which we go unto heavenly glory.

    No wonder is it then that the psalmist prays that he may be taught good judgment and knowledge. The more knowledge we have of God's promises, the more we will be able to judge that He is dealing well with us and bringing us to what He promised. Look at this present life under the curse, and at the fleshly pleasures which God has not promised, and we will complain and say that He is not dealing well with us. But believing, as the psalmist confesses, that we are His servants, we will look for the day when we can serve Him perfectly. And we will be interested in everything that helps us get there and now reminds us of our calling.

    Do you want that kind of heavenly life hereafter? Then you will see that God is dealing with you as He promised and that all is well. Pray that you may have good judgment and knowledge.

Read: Psalm 119:65-80
Psalter versification: 329:1

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 245
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
1 Chronicles 28 ; 1 Chronicles 29:1-30
Romans 5:6-21
Psalm 15:1-5
Proverbs 19:18-19

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Quote for Reflection:

Preaching that does not convict of sin is fundamentally corrupt. How could that be preaching of the Word of God to sinful saints that does not convict of sin? It must convict of sin, not merely in the shallow sense in which it is frequently understood and practiced in Methodistic circles, so that one is convicted of sin once in his life and then he is saved and the matter is settled: but it must convict all the hearers of sin constantly. And convicting of sin it must rebuke the sinner so convinced, i.e., severely censure him, so that he feels utterly condemned and undone before the face of God. But it must also exhort, comfort, lead to the cross, to the resurrection, to the forgiveness of sin and the righteousness which is in Christ Jesus by faith, lead to the glory of the inheritance incorruptible and undefiled and that fadeth not away, admonish to persevere even unto the end and to keep the eye on the Light that flashes from the tower on the pier, till the safe harbor is reached. Herman Hoeksema (Standard Bearer, Vol. 10)


July 20

THE BLESSEDNESS OF AFFLICTIONS
Psalm 119:67,68

    Before we turn on the light in the middle of the night, the darkness keeps us from seeing the objects that are around us. But after the light is turned on we can see them. And we do well to bear in mind that we are in the night of sin and death, and that in that darkness we cannot see our sins as sins and realize the awfulness of their punishment.

    A truth we do well to bear in mind therefore is that God must, and in His grace does, turn on the light by sending afflictions. That is right! By means of afflictions God opens our eyes to the fact that there is a curse upon this earth because of sin, and that "the wages of sin is death." That is why the psalmist writes in Psalm 119:67,68, "Before I was afflicted I went astray: but now have I kept Thy word. Thou art good and doest good; teach me Thy statutes."

    That he went astray means that he went into ways of sin and death. And when God afflicted him, He also in His grace, and by His Spirit, made him see his waywardness as sin, and that he deserved God's wrath upon him. In that way God brought him back to keep His word.

    After God turned on the light for him, He also caused the psalmist to write, "Thou art good and doest good." Indeed, by all our sicknesses and diseases,     sorrows, and bereavements God opens our eyes to the fact of sin and guilt and to bring us to pray, as the psalmist does, that He will teach us His statutes.

    No, these afflictions do not deny the fact that Christ suffered all our punishment and blotted out all our guilt. But while we are still in this sinful flesh we need afflictions, and to see afflictions upon the world around us, to make us aware of our sins and to appreciate the cross of Christ and thereby taste God's goodness. We cannot do that if we do not see ourselves as sinners.

    Let us therefore with the psalmist sing:

    Before my affliction I wandered,
    But now Thy good word I obey;
    Thou, Who art holy and gracious,
    Now teach me Thy statutes, I pray.

Read: II Corinthians 4
Psalter versification: 329:2

Daily  Meditations
 
 on the
Heidelberg Catechism

Song for Meditation: Psalter number 367
Why not sing along??

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Through the Bible in One Year
Read today:
2 Chronicles 1 ; 2 Chronicles 2 ; 2 Chronicles 3:1-17
Romans 6:1-23
Psalm 16:1-11
Proverbs 19:20-21

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Quote for Reflection:

"Good works are the best ornament; these are, in the sight of God, of great price. Those that profess godliness should, in their dress, as well as other things, act as becomes their profession; instead of laying out their money on fine clothes, they must lay it out in good works of piety and charity...." Matthew Henry on I Tim.2:9-10


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